AH 002# Revit Design Options

Before I begin, I will say that there is a vast amount of knowledge on this particular subject – right at your fingertips.

Lynda is an online tutorial based knowledge hub which lists everything from Revit Design Options right down to Sustainablilty and Biophilic Architecture – you name it – they have it!

https://www.lynda.com/Revit-training-tutorials/1533-0.html

If this blog isn’t clear enough – I recommend having a look at the website above.

So, you are unclear of Revit Design Options? First off, you should establish why you want to use them. Internal layout? Facade change? or Massing concepts? – You’re in the right place.

  1. Start with your existing project – Here I have loaded a basic design which I will multiply and reconifgure using Design Options.
Previous model used in a project
NB this exists in the Main Model highlighted below

2. Go to your main toolbar – Manage -Design Options. Click on the Design Options button

2. Design options button highlighted in purple

3. A new window will open, showing the design options within the model. This is still a blank canvas.

Click on New Option Set, this will create a primary option – this automatically replicates your main model. Click new option to create a secondary option.

4. Et Voila, after a bit of modelling we now have an embellished design Option 01 – again note at the bottom of the screen where it states Option 01 – Primary

Design Option 01

Option 02 – little bit clunkier and more elaborate. Both types exist in the model and are interchangeable.

Design Option 02

Top tip – to compare and contrast Design Options utilising the same views – duplicate the views, assign a view template to all, but in the template click the desired Design Option from the drop down list otherwise this will remain <automatic>.

If you require assistance, elaboration on different settings or top tips, please don’t hesitate to let me know and I’ll do a feature on it.

#003 Bourne Estate

I recently went on a delightful Saturday afternoon excursion to the Bourne Estate. The Architect was hosting a walking tour around the recently developed scheme, courtesy of The Architecture Foundation.

The Architect, Matthew Lloyd, gave a small group of us a tour around the London Borough of Camden residential scheme, which sits proudly as an addition to the existing Grade II* listed estate. The new development is a mixed tenure scheme and creates pockets of open spaces within the estate.

Personally, I really enjoyed the new development. The materiality chosen was a delightful addition to the existing red brick façade of the Grade II* listed estate, bosting facades of ceramic tiles and archways – not only visually attractive, but exceptionally easy to maintain. As pointed out to us all – there is a reason why so many Underground stations have glazed tiles – they can be wiped clean of graffiti and dirt, no need to repaint and are capable of handling a large amount of traffic if needed.

The new scheme incorporated key elements of design which derived from the original estate, such as the shared access and balconies for at most 4 flats, to ensure no overcrowding and a sense of ownership. Multiple ground entrances, and open walkways to show the movement and activity of the estate.  

Each new block is designed with GLA minimum standards, and so each resident has space to move and embrace as their own. Overall, I feel it is an incredibly successful scheme, one which I personally, would love to live in.

The practice was praised by the Camden Design Awards jury in 2017 as “highly intelligent and mature response to the existing Edwardian architecture”.

The residential block has been inhabited since 2018, and walking around it 2 years later, it shows extraordinary wear and tear – by this I mean, it looks brand new. There is no visible degradation of the façade or internal communal staircases, lobbies or access routes.